UEFA: When John Terry played defense for England inside the net! — Tola Adenle

June 20, 2012

Sports, World

John Terry wouldn’t be in the big leagues if he did not know when, as a football player, he has run out of real estate as a popular basketball parlance for those moves that see a player scrambling for ball out of the playing box and then believing he still has a ball in play which could see a 260-pounder passing a basketball – sometimes while balancing on a 130-pound front-row spectator!

At least the goal posts and net do not allow that kind of happening; the only time football guys could knock a spectator down is after goals have been scored and guys race to their corners of fan-zone to celebrate where fans seemingly wait to be crushed.
It is heartening that Sepp Blatter, FIFA’s generally see-no-evil even when it stares him in the face is now on the same page with most sports fans on goal line tech but that is small consolation for Ukraine which saw England stole a goal it did not earn in the decisive final match of who goes forward to the knock-out stages of the ongoing UEFA.
Those who have been badgered by my sports musings over the years know that I am not a big fan of English soccer although the fans seem to have calmed down considerably these last couple of years.

The FA naturally expects big things from the lads and the fans expect bigger things which all boils down to pressuring these lads so much that they expect to win even when they have a worse than sub-par team. It also sees those who have labored hard for the team thrown out like a dirty habit once they make a mistake or fail to win a cup.

It is apparent that even if a dozen FIFA officials are on the field, balls that clearly cross the line before “defense” springs into action would always count as no-goal; there were a mere five officials whose eyes went astray as Devic’s clear goal crossed the line but my grouse is: Terry was aware he cheated.

How does Terry feel seeing the pictures of his “defensive effort” over and over again when he knows what he did is a disgrace to his country and, if he does not know it or care, to himself? Where does that leave England: must win at any cost?

Thank God, GLT will finally be tabled at FIFA this year but small consolation for Ukraine and all those teams that have lost over the years over Blatter’s – and FIFA’s – intransigence about the necessity of allowing technology to be deployed to the aid of soccer.

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7 Comments on “UEFA: When John Terry played defense for England inside the net! — Tola Adenle”

  1. Fatai Bakare Says:

    Well, we can say JT cheated after watching the play back. But at the time of action JT would not have known he cheated as he followed the ball up into the net for clearance. Similarly, anybody that is not close to the goal area might not have known that the ball was cleared out after crossing the goal line. There is the benefit of doubts that he, JT, might not have known that he had crossed the goal line with the ball while the action lasted. more so that the ball had not landed and was still in the air for his clearance. We should not blame JT or any player for that matter. The culprit was the extra ref on that side of England who was put there purposely to detect any infringement within the 18yd-box.Even if we have 100 cameras around there, players could still clear out balls and it is left for the opposing team to protest and call for a goal.

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    • emotan77 Says:

      Dear Fatai, thanks for this.

      I agree with your arguments and it COULD be that Terry could not feel what he was doing although I doubt it much as I appreciate that instincts, as much as adrenaline, are always the drivers at matches. Your English lads are always under tremendous pressure as nothing less than victory is good enough for England which is a great wish but the material that would produce victories must be there. Unfortunately, the golden age of England football on the international arena seems long gone.

      As for the blind referree, I’m no longer surprised. Ordinarily, a spectator ordinarily has his/her eyes on the ball in play and a paid official should not be expected to do less but in football, referrees are often excused as having missed what they are paid to do: do nothing but keep eyes on the ball. Crooked?

      Revolving door coaches; lack of patience towards those who could become if given the time, antagonism, nay, pure hatred of the Beckhams, etcetera are a few of the sore points in English football despite being home to football’s Arch-Cathedral at City of Manchester AND zillions of sterling thrown at the game.

      And the last of my unsought penny-worth opinions? I’ve written about this many times: restructure the system that sees player jumping from bed to bed without fulfilling their obligations at team that drafted them.

      All the above might help England sift AND keep the best for the National team.

      I do have two past World Cup tee shirts, Fatai, thanks to two sons-in-law who are England fan-atics, perhaps like you. Rule Britannia?

      Regards,
      TOLA.

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      • Falade A.G. Says:

        ”How does Terry feel seeing the pictures of his “defensive effort” over and over again when he knows what he did is a disgrace to his country and, if he does not know it or care, to himself?”

        I’m happy that Mr. Fatai Bakare and you agreed that Terry did what he did out of REFLEX. It’s also possible that the extra referee did not appreciate the goal. The answer, as you have suggested is: Goal Line Technology. I wonder the reason why Mr. Sepp Blatter has been reluctant!

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      • emotan77 Says:

        Dear Fatai, thanks for this.

        I agree with your arguments and it COULD be that Terry could not feel what he was doing although I doubt it much as I appreciate that instincts, as much as adrenaline, are always the drivers at matches. Your English lads are always under tremendous pressure as nothing less than victory is good enough for England which is a great wish but the material that would produce victories must be there. Unfortunately, the golden age of English football on the international arena seems long gone.

        As for the blind referree, I’m no longer surprised. Ordinarily, a spectator ordinarily has his/her eyes on the ball in play and a paid official should not be expected to do less but in football, referrees are often excused as having missed what they are paid to do: do nothing but keep eyes on the ball. Crooked?

        Revolving door coaches; lack of patience towards those who could become great if given the time, antagonism, nay, pure hatred of the Beckhams, etcetera are a few of the sore points in English football despite being home to football’s Arch-Cathedral at City of Manchester AND zillions of sterling thrown at the game.

        And the last of my unsought penny-worth opinions? I’ve written about this many times: restructure the system that sees player jumping from bed to bed without fulfilling their obligations at team that drafted them.

        All the above might help England sift AND keep the best for the National team.

        I do have two past World Cup tee shirts, Fatai, thanks to two sons-in-law who are England fan-atics, perhaps like you. Rule Britannia?

        Regards,
        TOLA.

        Like

      • emotan77 Says:

        Thanks, Prof.
        Now that England is in the quarters, we await more exciting times but one prediction I can make and for which I would not mind taking back my words is that the lads flying the flag of St. George are not going to win!

        Regards, as always,
        TOLA.

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      • Fatai Bakare Says:

        Mr Blatter is dragging his feet because he is time conscious. He is thinking a lot of time will be wasted for the game to be stopped and to read the camera. However, he will have no choice than to succumb because almost all countries and FIFA Exco/ Members are clamoring for the technology. There will always be a way out of the time factor when the time comes.

        I believe we have football lawyers who would draft out the rules.

        I am not an England fan per say because the players are too over-rated by their press and this puts too much pressure on the boys and the manager. This will be to their detriment. I agree with you it will be by sheer luck for England to pass through to the Semis talk less of winning the cup. They have to pass through Italy and possibly Germany. These are countries with good and tested players in all aspect of the game. Spain is still No 1.

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      • emotan77 Says:

        Dear Fatai,

        Thanks a mil.

        Blatter has caved in; it’s the Plattinis of the UEFA world that want to hold on to a system that has proved ineffective.

        By the way, the just-concluded NBA Finals bring to mind one of the main problems I see in English Football: the boys are their own bosses even when under contract. A kid signs a 5-year contract to play with Arsenal but before the first year is out, he’s eyeing greener pastures, no thanks to lecherous agents. I once suggested the NFA borrows a leaf from the NBA and hold players to their contracts until free agency sets in.

        There are tons of money to throw at mediocre players, and there are zillions of fans willing to pay outrageous gate fees; so why change a formula that works!

        Regards,
        TOLA.

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